"Let books be your dining table, / And you shall be full of delights. / Let them be your
mattress,/
And you shall sleep restful nights" (St. Ephraim the Syrian).


Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Georges Florovsky and the Fathers

I just got the T&T Clark/Bloomsbury catalogue in the mail, and was delighted to notice a volume coming out in late 2016 edited by my friend Brandon Gallaher with Paul Ladouceur as co-editor: The Patristic Witness of Georges Florovsky: Essential Theological Writings (October 2016, 304pp).

About this book the publisher tells us:
This book is a collection of major articles and texts by Georges Florovsky (1893-1979), an important 20th-century theologian, historian, ecumenist and patristic scholar. It includes representative and widely influential but now largely inaccessible writings, some newly translated, with explanatory and bibliographical notes, covering all periods of his career and divided into four major thematic sections: 1) Creation and Incarnation; 2) The Nature of Theology; 3) Ecclesiology and Eschatology; 4) Scripture, Worship and Eschatology.
A foreword by Metropolitan Kallistos Ware presents the theological vision of Georges Florovsky and discusses the continuing relevance of his work not only for Orthodox theology but also for modern theology in general. The Introduction by Brandon Gallaher and Paul Ladouceur gives a broad theological and historical overview of Florovsky's work, relating it to trends in both modern Roman Catholic and Protestant theology and outlining his importance to contemporary ecumenism, patristics and Orthodox thought and life. The book includes explanatory notes, translation of patristic citations and an index of proper names.
I shall be glad to call attention to this again closer to publication time, and to arrange an interview with the editors if I can. For Florovsky, of course, remains one of the most important (some would say the most important) Orthodox theologians of the 20th century, and his death in 1979 has if anything only increased interest in his work, as Paul Gavrilyuk's recent book on Florovsky makes clear. 

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