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And you shall sleep restful nights" (St. Ephraim the Syrian).


Thursday, June 19, 2014

Can We All Declare the Filioque Debate Over and Move On?

After the 2003 statement of the North American Orthodox-Catholic dialogue (preceded by the 1995 statement from Rome, both available here), after the superlative work of A. Edward Siecienski (whom I interviewed here), The Filioque: History of a Doctrinal Controversy, and after the recognition and admission, by leading Catholic and Orthodox scholars alike, that the filioque is no longer a church-dividing issue, can we not all agree to just move on to something else? Of course, a few fanatics on the fringes of Catholicism and Orthodoxy want to keep parading this issue about to justify their own bigotry and division, but we need not detain ourselves with them.

If there is much else to be said on the topic, a book coming out in August may well do so: Myk Habets, ed., Ecumenical Perspectives on the Filioque for the 21st Century (Bloomsbury Academic, 2014), 272pp.

About this collection we are told:
The volume presents a range of theological standpoints regarding the filioque. With some contributors arguing for its retention and others for its removal, still others contest that its presence or otherwise in the Creed is not what is of central concern, but rather that how it should be understood is of ultimate importance. What contributors share is a commitment to interrogating and developing the central theological issues at stake in a consideration of the filioque, thus advancing ecumenical theology and inter-communal dialogue without diluting the discussion. Contributors span the Christian traditions: Roman Catholic, Protestant, Eastern Orthodox, and Pentecostal. Each of these traditions has its own set of theological assumptions, methods, and politics, many of which are on display in the essays which follow. Nonetheless it is only when we bring the wealth of learning and commitments from our own theological traditions to ecumenical dialogue that true progress can be made. It is in this spirit that the present essays have been conceived and are now presented in this form.
The publisher also helpfully gives us the table of contents:

Contents
Dedication
Contents
Acknowledgments

Foreword: Ecumenical Reception of Ecumenical Perspectives on the Filioque. Steven R. Harmon

List of Contributors

1. Introduction: Ecumenical Perspectives and the Unity of the Spirit. Myk Habets
Part 1: The Filioque in Context: Historical and Theological

2. The Filioque: A Brief History. A. Edward Siecienski
 3. Theological Issues Involved in the Filioque. Paul D. Molnar
 4. The Filioque: Reviewing the State of the Question, with some Free Church Contributions. David Guretzki

Part 2: Developments in the Various Traditions
5. The Eternal Manifestation of the Spirit ‘Through the Son’ According to Nikephoros Blemmydes and Gregory of Cyprus. Theodoros Alexopoulos
6. The Spirit from the Father, of himself God: A Calvinian Approach to the Filioque Debate.
Brannon Ellis
7. Calvin and the Threefold Office of Christ: Suggestive Teaching Regarding the Nature of the Intra-Divine Life? Christopher R.J. Holmes
8. The Baptists ‘And The Son’: The Filioque Clause In Noncreedal Theology. David E. Wilhite
9. Baptized in the Spirit: A Pentecostal Reflection on the Filioque. Frank D. Macchia

Part 3: Opening New Possibilities: Origin, Action, & Intersubjectivity
10. Lutheranism and the Filioque. Robert W. Jenson
11. On Not Being Spirited Away: Pneumatology and Critical Presence. John C. McDowell
12. The Filioque: Beyond Athanasius and Thomas Aquinas: An Ecumenical Proposal. Thomas Weinandy
13. Beyond the East/West Divide. Kathryn Tanner
14. Getting Beyond the Filioque with Third Article Theology. Myk Habets
Contents
Dedication
Contents
Acknowledgments
Foreword: Ecumenical Reception of Ecumenical Perspectives on the Filioque. Steven R. Harmon
List of Contributors
1. Introduction: Ecumenical Perspectives and the Unity of the Spirit. Myk Habets
Part 1: The Filioque in Context: Historical & Theological
2. The Filioque: A Brief History. A. Edward Siecienski
3. Theological Issues Involved in the Filioque. Paul D. Molnar
4. The Filioque: Reviewing the State of the Question, with some Free Church Contributions. David Guretzki
Part 2: Developments in the Various Traditions
5. The Eternal Manifestation of the Spirit ‘Through the Son’ According to Nikephoros Blemmydes and Gregory of Cyprus. Theodoros Alexopoulos
6. The Spirit from the Father, of himself God: A Calvinian Approach to the Filioque Debate.
Brannon Ellis
7. Calvin and the Threefold Office of Christ: Suggestive Teaching Regarding the Nature of the Intra-Divine Life? Christopher R.J. Holmes
8. The Baptists ‘And The Son’: The Filioque Clause In Noncreedal Theology. David E. Wilhite
9. Baptized in the Spirit: A Pentecostal Reflection on the Filioque. Frank D. Macchia
Part 3: Opening New Possibilities: Origin, Action, & Intersubjectivity
10. Lutheranism and the Filioque. Robert W. Jenson
11. On Not Being Spirited Away: Pneumatology and Critical Presence. John C. McDowell
12. The Filioque: Beyond Athanasius and Thomas Aquinas: An Ecumenical Proposal. Thomas Weinandy
13. Beyond the East/West Divide. Kathryn Tanner
14. Getting Beyond the Filioque with Third Article Theology. Myk Habets
Index - See more at: http://www.bloomsbury.com/us/ecumenical-perspectives-on-the-filioque-for-the-21st-century-9780567500724/#sthash.uO67yTJQ.dpuf

1 comment:

  1. So if the debate is over and, as The Pontifical Council on Promoting Christian Unity has declared the more ancient usage of saying the Creed without the filioque as normative, wouldn't it be reasonable to think that members of the Latin rite might have the option to NOT use the filioque, if the ordinary so decided? Or something along those lines? How otherwise are the rank and file supposed to know that this debate is over?

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